24.1 C
Basseterre
Monday, June 27, 2022
HomeNewsInternational NewsReport on sexual abuse in German diocese faults retired pope

Report on sexual abuse in German diocese faults retired pope

spot_img

By GEIR MOULSON

BERLIN (AP) — A long-awaited report on sexual abuse in Germany’s Munich diocese on Thursday faulted retired Pope Benedict XVI’s handling of four cases when he was archbishop in the 1970s and 1980s. The law firm that drew up the report said that Benedict strongly denies any wrongdoing.

The findings, though, were sure to reignite criticism of Benedict’s record more than a decade after the first, and until Thursday only, known case involving him was made public.

The archdiocese commissioned the report from law firm Westpfahl Spilker Wastl nearly two years ago, with a mandate to look into abuse between 1945 and 2019 and whether church officials handled allegations correctly. The law firm examined church files and spoke to witnesses.

The archdiocese and the law firm said that top church officials were not informed of the results ahead of its publication. The current archbishop — Cardinal Reinhard Marx, a prominent reformist ally of Pope Francis — was faulted in two cases. He declined an invitation to attend the presentation, though his vicar general did attend and Marx scheduled a statement later Thursday.

Marx’s predecessors include the former Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, who served in Munich from 1977 to 1982 before becoming the head of the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and later being elected as pope. Benedict gave extensive written testimony for the report.

“In a total of four cases, we came to the conclusion that the then-archbishop, Cardinal Ratzinger, can be accused of misconduct,” said one of the reports’ authors, Martin Pusch.

Two of those cases, he said, involved perpetrators who offended while he was in office and were punished by the judicial system but were kept in pastoral work without express limits on what they were allowed to do. No action was ordered under canon law.

In a third case, a cleric who had been convicted by a court outside Germany was put into service in the Munich archdiocese and the circumstances speak for Ratzinger having known of the priest’s previous history, Pusch said.

Read More.

spot_img
spot_img

Most Popular

Advertisementspot_img
Advertisement
Contact a Program
If you are interested in a program or advertising, send us a message.
Send Message
Signup for our Newsletter
We'll only be in touch when we've something exciting to share.
We never share your details
No thanks
Subscribe